A review of the story of a farewell to arms

I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. In which I read a hundred so-called "classics" for the first time, then write reports on whether or not they deserve the label Book Published in the late s, right when Modernism was first starting to become a Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.

A review of the story of a farewell to arms

An overblown Hollywood extravaganza that was universally condemned when first released and hasn't improved with age, this third and final version of Hemingway's classic stars Jennifer Jones wife of producer David O.

This epic was the bow-out production for the dynamic Selznick, who openly stated that the heavily funded film was a special vehicle for Jones, a bit of partial casting that backfired when audiences and critics alike rejected the year-old actress in her role as the young nurse.

In the familiar Hemingway story, she meets and falls in love with ambulance driver Hudson, gets pregnant, and delivers a dead child, dying herself a few hours later, while Hudson comments, "Poor kid!

Maybe this is the price you pay for sleeping together.

A review of the story of a farewell to arms

He himself contributed to the film's demise by constantly interfering with the production, deluging director John Huston later replaced by Charles Vidor with contradictory memos on how to shoot the film almost frame by frame. The chief virtue of this hollow epic is the stupendous color photography of the Italian Alps by Piero Portalupi and Oswald Morris, who capture the landscape in breathtaking, panoramic shots.

Also enjoyable is Vittorio De Sica's inspired performance as the wily Maj.

A review of the story of a farewell to arms

Rinaldi, but it's not enough to offset the flagrant overacting by Jones and the woodenness of Hudson. This nepotistic catastrophe actually features a well-written script by veteran screenwriter Hecht who knew Hemingway when they were young reporters in Chicago after WW Ibut his lines are so badly mangled by the leads that little of the terse dialog has any impact.

You are not entitled, therefore, to the privileges of an artist with an investment. Huston told Selznick that allowing the producer to manipulate him and the story and allowing Jones to continue in her histrionics made Huston feel like a "prostitute," to which Selznick countered, "Maybe my way of making pictures is not your way, but it's the only way I know De Sica garnered an Oscar nomination for his supporting performance.There will be debate as to whether "A Farewell to Arms" is a finer piece of work than "The Sun Also Rises." And there will be cogent arguments advanced on either side.

On the surface, the newer story is more effective than the earlier novel. A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, /5.

"A Farewell to Arms" is a lavish production of a love story set against the backdrop of World War I.

In that respect it's in the same genre as other classic war romances "Gone with . A Farewell To Arms demands the reader's patience, and then rewards it ten-fold. For example, there is a specific passage toward the end of the book which F. Scott Fitzgerald praised as "the finest passage ever written in the history of the English language.".

The website notes that such events provided fodder for Hemingway when he was writing A Farewell to Arms, a book which tells the story of a World War I ambulance driver who falls in love with a nurse. Considered a classic, the novel brings readers into that war as it is slowly winding to its conclusion.

A Farewell To Arms demands the reader's patience, and then rewards it ten-fold. For example, there is a specific passage toward the end of the book which F. Scott Fitzgerald praised as "the finest passage ever written in the history of the English language.".

Book Review: A Farewell to Arms «